Tag Archives: Family history

Stoneleigh, 51 Queens Road: “Domestic Unhappiness, the Result of Drink”

When I am the bus stop on Queens Road (the last stop before Victoria Park), waiting for the number 44, I often look at the houses on either side of the road.  I really like the silly, grandiose house names their builders gave them.  It’s quite fun that for the first 20 or 30 years of their life, those houses were often actually known by their names rather than street number.  One of these is Stoneleigh, number 51 Queens Road.  There is a rather sad story of a family who lived there during the 1890s.

51 Queens Road

51 Queens Road

Fanny Burdett (c1851-1898) was born in Chichester and shortly afterwards moved with her parents to Marylebone, London.  From a young age she worked as a dressmaker.  Whilst in London she met Henry Rogers (1848-1920), a young tailor, and they married in 1878.  They moved to Leicester before 1881, settling in London Road, and by 1891 lived at Evington Street whilst keeping the London Road premises for the tailoring business – military and livery.  They had the usual Victorian brood; seven surviving children; five girls and two boys born between 1879 and 1892.

Some time between 1891 and 1895 Henry, Fanny and the children moved to Stoneleigh, number 51 Queens Road Clarendon Park.  Despite the relative prosperity of the family – they always kept at least one servant, usually two – and the respectable appearance of the house, the Rogers were in crisis.  Fanny was an alcoholic, her behaviour at times “like a maniac” and the children were suffering.  Henry tried to protect them, but Fanny had been addicted to drink for many years and he eventually saw no option but to force her to leave the house and children.

At some point the family became known to the NSPCC, still in its infancy having been established in 1884, and brought a case to the Borough Police Court in January 1896.  An inspector reported that the children had been ill treated, that they were horror-stricken and that there was a danger of the younger children losing their reason.  The only answer was for Fanny to be permanently separated from her children.  A document, which Henry had already prepared, was produced at court for Fanny to sign.  Provision was made for Fanny’s financial support.  The Bench agreed that the prosecution did not need to go ahead.

Fanny returned to London, where she died just two years later, probably from the effects of her alcoholism.  Henry and the seven children (Florence Annie, Gertrude Helen, Harry Burdett, Maud Eveline, Arthur Redfern, Mabel Winifred and Elsie Gwendolyn) remained at Stoneleigh for another few years.  Henry’s business grew.  He opened a shop at 22 Market Street.  Then between 1901 and 1906 the family moved to Bush Close, a house in Springfield Road.  Sadly Arthur died in 1907, aged just 17.

Arthur Redfern Rogers died on 20th November 1907 and was buried three days later at St Mary Magdalene, Knighton

Arthur Redfern Rogers died on 20th November 1907 and was buried three days later at St Mary Magdalene, Knighton

Henry continued his business with the help of his remaining son Harry, before dying in 1920.  He left over £14,000, a good sum of money.

I wondered whether, as the NSPCC inspector had feared, whether Fanny’s children really did lose their reason.  There isn’t much to go on, but of the six surviving children only two married (Harry and Maud).  Gertrude and Maud worked for a time as governesses – meaning that their education probably far exceeded that of their parents.  Florence, the eldest, moved just round the corner to 36 Portland Road, and the remaining unmarried sisters Gertrude, Mabel and Gwendolyn, lived and died (in old age) together at Hove in Sussex.  Harry also stayed in Leicester, after fighting in Egypt during the Great War.  There’s nothing to say that anyone lost their reason, but it’s still a sad story.  Something to ponder at the bus stop.  Elizabeth

Remembering the Clarendon Park Fallen: Claude Francis Alexander (1893-1918)

Claude Francis Alexander was born in Leicester in 1893, the eldest son of George Alexander (1870-1949) and Sarah Mutton (1872-1927).  Claude and his siblings Reginald George (1895-1955), Charles (1897-1925) and Marjorie Florence (1910-) lived firstly at one end of Hartopp Road – number 116 – and then at the other.  When Claude and Reginald signed up to join the Territorial Army it was while the family was living at number 9 Hartopp Road.  The family were Baptists.

9 Hartopp Road

Claude joined the Leicestershire Regiment in October 1914, when he was working as a clerk for a shoe manufacturer.  He started as a private but was promoted to lance corporal in 1916, and 5 months later to corporal.  Claude served in France, returning home briefly every year.  In 1917 he suffered a wound to his left knee and spent a couple of months in hospital in Bristol, but returned to France and was killed on 17th July 1918, less than three months before the end of the war.  He is buried at Fouquieres-les-Bethune, Pas de Calais, along with 386 of his compatriots, mainly fellow Territorial forces.  He never married.

Claude’s brother Reginald survived the war.  He joined the Territorial Army in 1913 aged just 17 and just 5 feet and 5 inches tall when he was a clothing dresser in the emply of Messrs Thorneloe Clarkson (in Northampton Street).  Sadly records of Reginald’s full service are lost, but we do know that he married Doris Stuffins in 1928 and lived in Leicester until his death in 1955.

A Sneak Peek At Reg Pratt

I was walking along Howard Road yesterday afternoon on my way back from the record office, and this rather charming sign was uncovered.  The building is yet another being converted from a shop into a house – hopefully with more sensitivity than some I have seen lately.  Does anyone know anything about this business on the corner of Lytton Road and Howard Road?  R Pratt (greengrocer) appears in Kelly’s Directory of 1960 at 17 Lytton Road, telephone number 78017, which seems to be the same premises.  Also on Lytton Road that year were Tandy Brothers Ltd (painting contractors) at number 16, G G Marriott (painter and decorator) at number 31, and Thomas Albert Viles (boot and shoe repairer) at number 63.

Image

I wish there was still a greengrocers there, instead of another horrible rendered house with plastic windows…Image

 

Clarendon Park in 1960 Part 1: Clarendon Park Road

This week’s local history purchase was the 1960 Kelly’s Directory of Leicester, which was published at the tail end of the publishing history of the trade/street directory.  The binding is still the familiar red, gold and black with advertising on every possible surface, and it’s still a weighty tome – but Kelly’s and its rivals faced competition from telephone directories and by 1960 its days were numbered.  It’s still a fascinating read for those of us so inclined, and I have enjoyed making comparisons between Clarendon Park in 1960 and 1912.

Although Queens Road is the obvious choice, for comparing the shops and businesses of the past and present, I find the lesser shopping streets more interesting.  I started with Clarendon Park Road, which several older residents of Clarendon Park Road have told me used to be full of useful little shops.  I took a notebook on a walk down Clarendon Park Road and noted the current shops and businesses.   I added these in italics to the list below of 1960 shops and businesses.  What is interesting is how many broadly similar or even the same businesses there are trading at quite a few of the premises – such as a branch of the Belgrave Laundry Co at number 107, which is now Bliss dry cleaners, or the bicycle dealer John E Chamberlain at 214-6 (now Julies Cycles).  Some businesses have moved to different premises, such as Spiers Pharmacy, which in its earlier incarnation was at the premises now occupied by Hot Ice Printing.

There are also a lot of changes.  There aren’t any greengrocers on Clarendon Park these days, more’s the pity – but we do have a few take aways and a running shop (which I suspect would have been utterly baffling to the Clarendon Park residents of 1960!).  I was surprised at how many shops and businesses there still are on Clarendon Park Road.  I had expected the number to have dropped considerably.  There are some former shops that have been rather insensitively converted to houses, and some attractive shop fronts that have been badly modernised (the former Tango tanning shop at 179 and 181 for example.  Grey double glazing is never a good look, chaps).  But on the whole we are very lucky in still retaining much of the Victorian character of the shops and houses on Clarendon Park Road.  Let’s keep it that way.

* Disclaimer: Many of the shops and businesses on Clarendon Park Road don’t have visible street numbers, so there may be some small errors (please feel free to point them out to me!).

Clarendon Park Road

  • 107 Belgrave Laundry Co Ltd, the (branch office) Bliss – dry cleaning
  • 109 Mitton, Wm – upholsterer Mittons – carpets and mattresses
  • 111 Kirby & West Ltd – dairymen Mittons
  • 111A Dilks, R & Co Ltd – hosiery manufacturers
  • 113 Matthews, N P – auto body repairs  Red Cross mobility shop
  • 113 Leicester Car Valet Services
  • 117 Tony’s Cut Price Stores – grocers Natwest Bank
  • 123 Copping, Jack – newsagent
  • 125 York, Wm – ophthalmic optician
  • 127 Brown, Harold F & Co Ltd – plumbers Habito – lettings agent
  • 129 Clarke’s Shoe Repair Service Empty – was antiques
  • 131 Cave, Ernest Arthur – fruiterer TJs Burgers and Kebabs
  • 131 Tanner, A G – motor engineer Gents & Boys Hairdressers
  • 157 Warren, Frederick William – boot dealer Labels – designer dress agency
  • 161 The Tawa Curry Hut – takeaway
  • 163 Smith, William H (Coal and transport) Ltd – motor coach proprietors First4Lettings
  • 165/7 Popple, S H – clothing manufacturers
  • 179 & 181 Worthington’s Cash Stores – grocers Stetfords lettings
  • 193 Hubbard, Mrs E M – newsagent
  • 195 Leicester Horticultural Engineering Co Ltd – horticultural machinery engineers
  • 199 Leicester Trustee Savings Bank (branch) Power Thompson
  • 201 Rowley, William – grocer Knighton Supermarket
  • 205 Rowley, R – fishmonger Knighton Flowers
  • 217 Spiers,  Arthur H – chemist Hot Ice Printing
  • (Clarendon Park Baptist Chapel) N&S Coaches Ltd – motor coach proprietors
  • 229 Parton, J L – chiropodist
  • 231 S R Parton & Associates – chiropodists and podiatrists
  • 241 Allen, Ernest A – painter & decorator
  • 245 Langran, Ronald J – newsagent Stuff – antiques & curios
  • 247 Roxby’s – drapers Revivals – dress and toy agency
  • 249 Parry, L – wallpaper dealer
  • 251 Jesson, I M – confectioner
  • 257 Green, Mrs M – teacher of music
  • 277 Plinsent, Arthur Ernest – shopkeeper
  • 323 Worsley, W – confectioner
  • 325/7 Spiers Pharmacy

Evens

  • (Parish church of St John the Baptist)
  • 64 Whowell, William & Son Ltd – crepe rubber factors ( Plantation ho)
  • 66 Reggio Garage – motor engineers Reggio Garage
  • (St John the Baptist Junior School)
  • (British Legion – Knighton Branch)
  • (St John’s Church Rooms)
  • 78 Radar Electrical Co – television installations Anita’s cards/Radar
  • 82 Adlard & Roffe – bakers
  • 84 The Loughborough Building Society
  • 98 Peadon S A & Son Ltd – bakers Rebecca’s – cakes
  • 140 Weaver, Edward G – hairdresser Kanta Mantini hairdressers
  • 142 Elson, Mrs H – confectioner The Offie – beer retailer/off license
  • 144 Clarendon Books – secondhand bookshop
  • 146 Armstrong, C P – greengrocer The New Golden Chef – chinese take away
  • 146 Leicester Running Shop
  • 160 Pickering, H – joiner
  • 190 Hobson, Ernest D – boot repairer Ellerington Fine Art Gallery (opens September 2012)
  • 192 Smith, J S (Leicester) Ltd – hardware dealers Lucky 13 Tattoo
  • 196 Ruckley, Gordon W – stationer The Snug – beauty parlour
  • 196 Lorne Road Post Office
  • 198 Clarendon House – chinese take away
  • 200/204 Leicester Co-operative Society Ltd – grocers Co-operative
  • (Aged Pilgrims’ Friend Society’s Homes)
  • 208 Roxby’s – drapers Central Studios – photographers
  • 214/216 Chamberlain, John E – cycle agent Julies Cycles
  • 228 Sarson, Joyce E – greengrocer
  • 246 Shrimpton, Miss Frances – dressmaker
  • 280 Ward, J – butcher Charlie’s Pine
  • 296 McCoan, Colin K – physician Clarendon Medical Centre

More about 51 Montague Road

Whilst I was researching Leonard Norman and his photography/picture framing business at 28-30 Montague Road in the 1890s and possibly later at 51 Montague Road, I came across another small story about a former occupant of number 51.  It comes again from the Leicester Chronicle, this time the 5th May 1894 (so as Leonard was just settling in to 28 Montague Road).

Harriet Wills was fined ten shillings for being drunk and disorderly in Montague Road the previous Saturday night.  And she a married woman in her fifties too!  That can’t have been much fun to live down with the neighbours, most of whom were no doubt very respectable.  Clarendon Park did have a reputation as a drunken place.  There is a fantastic cartoon displayed at the Abbey Pumping Station museum called ‘Last Tram Back to Clarendon Park’ or something very similar, depicting a tram overflowing with drunken, dazed or fighting people.  I wonder if the last 44a has the same reputation today?  Regards, Elizabeth.

51 Montague Road

Leonard Norman, a Clarendon Park Photographer

Sometimes I come across something on Ebay that really excites me.  Just a couple of weeks ago I spent the best part of thirty quid on a collection of 66 cartes de visite and cabinet cards barely held together by a falling apart album of very questionable taste – just to get hold of a single image that definitely isn’t worth £30.  But I didn’t care, firstly because the collection belonged to a Leicester family whose tree I have been growing from the tiny acorn of a single named and dated photograph, and secondly because the cabinet card I wanted is perfect.  Here is all about it.

The photographer is L. Norman of Clarendon Studio, Montague Road, Clarendon Park.  The card stock (dark green), the gold bevelled edge, the studio name in gold all point to a picture taken during the early 1890s.  The image is of a little girl in an outfit that almost certainly isn’t hers, and it’s not a very good image either – too much light in the top right hand corner and the little girl’s black- stockinged legs disappear in the gloom behind her.  However that really awful vase and feather are beautifully clear.

A trip to Leicestershire Records Office told me quite a bit about Leonard.  Leonard was born in Knighton village in 1870 and after school began work, as so many did, as a shoe clicker.  He moved to 28 Montague Road in 1893 (shortly after his marriage to Elizabeth Carter) and 30 Montague Road – the most likely premises for “Clarendon Studio” in 1897.  I suspect he occupied both 28 and 30 Montague Road between 1893 and 1907, when he moved to 51 Montague Road.  None of the street directories of the period described Leonard Norman as a photographer, in fact his first entry is in Wright’s Directory of Leicestershire in 1906, at 30 Montague Road, as a “picture framer.”  

30 Montague Road. It is still fairly apparent that this was once a shop premises

The 1901 census described him as “shopkeeper and picture framer.”  Picture framing and photography often went together at this time, for obvious reasons.  Leonard’s last directory entry was in 1912, but by this time he had already returned to his previous work as a shoe clicker so either the entry was out of date or Leonard was only working as a framer in his spare time.  I wonder how seriously Leonard took the photography side of his business, and how successful it was.  Clearly not all that successful – I feel quite sorry for him.

51 Montague Road

I am fairly confident that I will be able to find out the name of the little girl in the picture, as long as she was related to the Hughes family of Thornton Lane, Leicester, whence my album originated – and I think she must have been.  So you can see why I was so excited to get hold of that tatty album.  Regards, Elizabeth.

The Probable Poisoning of George Scott Grainger

I recently read a sad article from the Leicester Chronicle which demonstrates how life has changed over the past 100 years .  George Scott Grainger aged 51 was admitted, unconscious, to the Leicester Royal Infirmary around 6.15pm on Monday 30 September 1890.  He later having never regained consciousness.   George, who was a gardener working at Victoria Park and then living at 17 Oxford Road, Clarendon Park,  had obtained some Corporation Diarrhoea Mixture from the Town Hall (people provided their own bottles) earlier that day.  However the mixture contained in the bottle George was holding when his wife found him contained tincture of opium, not Victorian Immodium.

17 Oxford Road (Oxford Road sits between Howard Road and Montague Road)

At the inquest Jane Grainger, said that on the morning of his death she left before George to go to work and he was not then complaining of diarrhoea.  At 2.30pm she was in Victoria Park and could not see her husband so she asked his colleague James Norwell where he was.  Norwell told her he had obtained medicine, so she “knew he must be very ill as he strongly disliked medicine.”  Jane went to look for George and found him lying in a field on Evington Lane, with the bottle in his hand.  He complained of diarrhoea.  He said he had consumed the entire contents of the bottle and felt quite well, and wanted to stay where he was as he was comfortable, but was moved in Dr Greasley’s carriage to the Highfields Hotel and afterwards to the LRI where he died.

A couple of things struck me about Jane’s story.  Firstly, it was very odd indeed that George’s own bottle should have contained opium, as the Town Hall folk must have dispensed quite a lot of diarrhoea mixture and it would soon have been obvious if their stock had replaced or contaminated with tincture of opium.  So perhaps George found that diarrhoea mixture was not efficacious and bought his own cure – opium – instead (opium was used in some diarrhoea preparations).  Secondly, when Jane found that her husband was not at work as expected, she naturally went to look for him.  But in a field in Evington Lane?  Perhaps all is not exactly as Jane described.  Perhaps she was used to finding him lying intoxicated in a field and knew where to look for him. It’s a good job the powers that be started to tighten the regulation of opium, making it harder for people to accidentally poison themselves, even if it sounds like George had quite a peaceful ending.

Jane had moved from 17 Oxford Rd by the time of the census in April 1891.  So many people seemed to have passed in and out of Clarendon Park without leaving much trace.  Poor George – in both senses – was buried in a common grave without a headstone at Welford Road cemetery and his wife never joined him.

Five sons in the service: A good way to make three quid

From the Leicester Chronicle Friday, December 29th , 1900 p2

Five Sons in the Service:  Queen’s Gift to a Leicester Man

Mr. Edmund G. Hanham, 19, Edward-road, Clarendon Park, who has five sons in the Service, has received the following letter from Sir Fleetwood Edwards, Keeper of the Privy Purse:-

Privy Purse Office, Buckingham Palace, S.W., 18th December 1900

 Lieut.-Colonel Sir Fleetwood Edwards is commanded to acknowledge the receipt of Mr. Edward G. Hanham’s letter of the 5th ulto., and, in reply, to say that the Queen is very much gratified to learn that Mr. Hanham has five sons at present in the Service, and Sir Fleetwood Edwards is further commanded to forward to Mr. Hanham the enclosed Post Office Order for three pounds from the Queen as a mark of her Majesty’s appreciation of this interesting fact, with the hope that it may be of some temporary assistance.

Clever Mr Hanham, spending ha’penny on a stamp to write to the Queen, and getting a postal order for three quid in return!  Edmund George Hanham (c1849 -1925) married Mary Ann Dawkes (1850 – 1934) in 1874 and together they had at least ten children.  Edmund was a sergeant in the Staffordshire militia, so it makes sense that so many of his children chose a military life.  On his retirement, the family moved to Edward Road in Clarendon Park, where Edmund set up as a boot and shoe maker.

Mary and Edmund’s children were: Edmund George Lawrence (1875-1901), Violette Polly (1876-), Frances May (1878-1878), Hedley Thomas (1878-1962), Archibald Harry (1881), Albert Victor (1883) Thomas (1884-1884), Charles Gordon (1885), Albert Edwin (1887), Christie (1887-1946)

I haven’t been able to find out about the military service of all Edmund’s sons, but here is what I did find:

Edmund George junior was a Sergeant Doctor in the South Staffordshire Regiment.  He died in January 1901 at Winburg, during the second Boer War of 1899-1902 and just a few days after the article in the Chronicle.  How awful for his father, to be recognised by the Queen one month and then the next, to lose one of his sons.

Hedley Thomas joined the 5th Duke of Wellington Regiment and later the Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry.  He was demobilised and became a warehouseman in Huddersfield.  In 1914 he again enlisted, rejoining the Duke of Wellingtons.  He returned to Huddersfield and died in 1962.

Christie joined the 5th Dragoon Guards in 1902.  he was wounded in South Africa in 1903 and again in 1904.  In 1905 he requested permission to emigrate to Canada – can’t say I blame him – but was refused.  He spent a few years in the Reserves before re-enlisting, then staying in the service until 1915.  His record states that he had a tattoo of a flower and two dots on his right forearm!  He never did make it to Canada: He died in Leicester in 1946.

The Hanhams didn’t stay in Clarendon Park for very long and were living elsewhere in Leicester by 1911.  I don’t suppose they made much of an impact on the area but the letter from Her Majesty must have stirred a lot of interest at the time.  Small stories, but interesting nevertheless.  Regards, Elizabeth.

The Grocer Who Fell Off The Wagon

15 & 17 Edward Road - a single property for over 100 years

Poor William Jennings.  In 1884 he lived in Edward Road and must have been one of the first residents.  He seems to have continually been applying for beer selling licenses – there was something of a scramble for off-licenses in Clarendon Park in the mid to late 1880s as it was being built, and with all that working class housing being hastily built, it could mean very lucrative trade.  William was finally granted his license in October 1886.  The Wright’s Directory of 1888 described him as a beer retailer, cowkeeper and shopkeeper at 15 and 17 Edward Road.  All looked well for prosperity.

But in October 1890 he received a nasty bump to the head when he fell out of a cart (see newspaper article below) or fell off the wagon – you have my husband to thank for that pun by the way.  Beer retailer, wagon, falling off – geddit?   That wasn’t the only thing going wrong for William at the time – he was seriously in debt and bankruptcy proceedings were brought against him in early February 1891.  By then he was living in lodgings on Clarendon Park Road, and certainly by April the premises were occupied by John Thomas Booton (33), grocer and range fitter, and his family.  John had already run a grocers and beer retailers of his own on the corner of Lorne Road/Clarendon Park Road (in fact he had applied for a beer license the very same day that William Jennings fell out of the cart and hurt his head).

On 25th February William was found to be £925 in debt, with assets of £750, leaving a surplus of £175.  He had sold the freehold on 15 and 17 Edward Road to his stepson on 29th January 1891, transferring the beer license to him shortly afterwards.  However, as the property was mortgaged the Official Receiver insisted the premises be sold at auction by Warner, Sheppard and Wade on 20th October 1891.  The premises are well described in the auction advertisement: “The House contains front shop, covering the whole frontage, several store-rooms, sitting room, kitchen and six bedrooms.  There is also a paved yard, with outbuildings and passage entrance….in addition to the Grocery Business it has an extensive out-door beer trade.”  The sale raised £760.

John Thomas Booton didn’t hang on to 15 and 17 Edward Road, at least as the occupant, because by 1899 the beer retailer (no pretence of groceries selling now) was Hannah Barrows.  It looks like the property hasn’t altered an enormous amount since then – although it is no longer a shop as Edward Road is a pretty quiet back street with no passing trade – and is still double fronted.  These days it is known as 17 Edward Road and number 15 just doesn’t exist.

The cause of William Jennings’ misery, in his own words, was that he had lost two cows in two years and had made many bad debts.  There must be a new year’s resolution in there somewhere.  Note to self:  No bad debts in 2012 (and don’t lose any cows).  Happy New Year everyone and thanks for reading, Elizabeth.

Leicester Chronicle, Saturday October 4th 1890, p6.

ACCIDENT – On Friday evening Mr. Jennings, aged 60, a grocer, living in Edward-road, Clarendon Park, was admitted to the Infirmary, suffering from injuries to his head, sustained by falling out of a cart.  He lies in a somewhat precarious position.

The West Street Butcher (but not that kind of butcher)

The gravestone of Frederick and Agnes Goodger

Those of you who read my blog regularly will know that I really enjoy taking a small piece of historical evidence and turning it into a story about someone’s life.  Well I’ve been at it again.  I had ten minutes to kill in Knighton churchyard and spent it taking photographs of the gravestones of former Clarendon Park residents.  The one that most took my fancy was that of Frederick Thomas Goodger, who “passed peacefully away” on 18th September 1908 aged 57.  Alongside is Frederick’s wife Agnes Mary Goodger, who outlived him by 24 years and died aged 82, still living at their former address of 33 West Avenue.

How did I know that the Goodgers were Clarendon Park residents?  It doesn’t say so on their grave stone,  but some time ago I made a database of all the Clarendon Park residents who were buried at St Mary Magdalene, Knighton before 1952 (there’s around 850 of them), which comes in handy sometimes.

Frederick was born in Leicester in 1851, the son of a painter.  He married Agnes Mary Price on 10th September 1872 at St Mary de Castro.  Within a short time (from at least 1876)  he had set himself up in business, as a butcher at 52 Shenton Street.  He took a loan of £100 from Sir Thomas White’s charity- which is still helping people start up in business in Leicester – in 1879, gaving him the capital to expand and improve his business, and take on new and better premises at Clarendon Park.  In 1891 he occupied 35 West Avenuen with wife, children and an apprentice.  By 1901 he also occupied 33 West Avenue, which was just as his adult daughters were working as milliners and dressmakers at home and no one likes their frock and hat to smell of raw meat.

35 West Avenue (corner of Cecilia Road)

After Frederick’s death, you might have expected Agnes his wife to live on the small amount left to her (£816) and her daughters’ assistance, but no – she gamely carried on the business with herself in the title role, so if you look at the trades directories of the 1910s you will find her under Butchers.  Misses Beatrice and Mabel never married (they were already old-ish for marriage by the time of the War) and they continued making dresses and millinery, probably scratching out a fairly basic but respectable existence and still occupying 33 and 35 West Avenue.  By the time Agnes died, there was nothing significant money-wise left to leave behind.

That’s another old shop I walk past most days, and I’m glad I decided to follow up the story behind Frederick and Agnes’s gravestone.  Regards, Elizabeth.

The premises are quite extensive, with a yard (where the initial butchering bit took place no doubt)

Ventilation for the cellar